American Folksongs of Protest

By John Greenway | Go to book overview

4. Songs of the miners

We have eyes to see like yours
Way down in the deep, deep mine;
But there's nothing to see but the dreadful dark
Where the sun can never shine
On the banks of the clammy coal.
Our lamps cast a flickering light
At the dreary bottom of the moist black hole
In the land of the noonday night.1

America's Hundred Years' War was fought in the coal fields. Since 1849, when an English Chartist named John Bates formed in Pennsylvania's Schuylkill County the first American miners' union, there have been hundreds of battles in this continuous struggle, and "battle" when used to describe the contention between the miners and operators is not a figure of speech. "There's blood on the coal and blood on the mines," one song says, "and blood on the mine owners' hands." The miners lost most of these

____________________
1
From the Amalgamated Journal, December 25, 1902. George Korson's research among the coal miners has been the only work of any thoroughness in the field of labor protest song. Since this chapter is to be read as a supplement to his studies ( Songs and Ballads of the Anthracite Miner, New York, 1927; Minstrels of the Mine Patch, Philadelphia, 1938; Coal Dust on the Fiddle, Philadelphia, 1943; Pennsylvania Songs and Legends, Philadelphia, 1949) I have not included any of these songs except "Mother Jones" and "Miner's Life." See also Aunt Molly Jackson's songs.

-147-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Folksongs of Protest
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • To Ruth v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1. an Historical Survey 21
  • 2. Negro Songs of Protest 67
  • 3. the Songs of the Textile Workers 121
  • 4. Songs of the Miners 147
  • 5. the Migratory Workers 173
  • 6. Songs of the Farmers 209
  • 7. a Labor Miscellany 225
  • 8. the Song-Makers 243
  • Appendix 311
  • Bibliography 329
  • List of Composers 339
  • List of Songs and Ballads 341
  • Index 345
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.