Nazis, Communists, Klansmen, and Others on the Fringe: Political Extremism in America

By John George; Laird Wilcox | Go to book overview

7
Spartacist League

"We are the Revolutionary Tendency expelled from the Socialist Workers party," said James Robertson when we visited his New York apartment in the summer of 1964. Robertson, a dedicated Trotskyist, believed that the Socialist Workers party (SWP) was acting in a manner contrary to what Leon Trotsky (assassinated in 1940) would have approved, had he been alive.

Robertson and his followers had begun to publish Spartacist and just over two years later, in 1966, the Spartacist League was officially established. Initially the group had about seventy-five members, and its membership has probably never exceeded two hundred, many of whom were defectors from the SWP.

In the manner of virtually all far-left groups, the Spartacist League has tried hard to recruit blacks. The result might best be described as a miserable failure. The organization also was among that minority of Marxist-Leninist ones having harsh words for Jesse Jackson during the 1984 presidential campaign, as they labeled him "an unprincipled opportunist." Attacking Jackson for his "Hymietown" remark, the Spartacists were even tougher on non-Marxists, especially Jews, who criticized him. They especially excoriated those Jews who had been complaining about anti-Semitic attitudes among some blacks, calling them "violent racists who believe the only good Palestinian Arab is a dead one." 1

Again, like so many extreme left organizations, the Spartacists have employed considerable bravado when claiming "victories" over tiny far-right grouplets such as the KKK and neo-Nazis. Members routinely turn up at "anti-Klan" rallies to shout their share of invectives and threats to demonstrate somewhat unconvincingly to the world that hatred is wrong.

Referring to a December 1982 Ku Klux Klan demonstration in Washington, for example, league publications Women and Revolution (Winter 1982-83), Workers Vanguard ( December 3, 1982), and Spartacist (Autumn 1983) featured identical headlines: "We Stopped The Klan." The Women and Revolution report reads in part:

More than 5,000 protesters--mostly black people and many of them unionists--chased the KKK out of Washington. . . . The race terrorists had said they would rally at the Capitol. . . . But the Klan did not march, did not rally, did not even put on their robes! Instead, thousands of anti-Klan militants at the Labor/ Black Mobilization rally blocked off the Klan's starting point and the cops had to sneak the Klansmen away in defeat.

-120-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nazis, Communists, Klansmen, and Others on the Fringe: Political Extremism in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 530

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.