Nazis, Communists, Klansmen, and Others on the Fringe: Political Extremism in America

By John George; Laird Wilcox | Go to book overview

Appendix I Fake Ouotes and Fabricated Documents: A Common Extremist Tactic
Quoting the famous for polemical purposes has been done by people residing in all parts of the political spectrum. Distorting quotations or actually concocting quotes or documents out of whole cloth has been a much-employed tactic by extremists, especially those of the right. While American leftists have used spuriosities of that sort sparingly, groups and individuals on the far right have raised such utilizations to a high art form. Probably this is more often done in ignorance; that is, quote users believe that the words "fit the situation" and simply use them without checking on authenticity. It is also the case that spurious quotes and documents have been put into print by people knowing all too well of their phoniness, but who nevertheless thrust them on the public in the name of a great ideological cause. Senator Joseph McCarthy was known to have concocted at least two nonquotes. Receiving the widest circulation was his pseudo-Leninism: "The world cannot exist half slave and half free. It must be all slave."The question arises as to how one determines whether a quote/document is fake. Some are not hard to spot because they border on the ridiculous: "There is only one way to kill capitalism--taxes, taxes, and more taxes," attributed to Karl Marx. Most, however, require at least a fair amount of research. Oft times the researcher cannot be certain and must be satisfied with the preponderance of the evidence. In some instances, however, one may be fortunate enough to discover the origin of a fake or find that a real quote has been distorted. Occasionally, the words were actually said, but not by the person to whom they have been attributed.Two important points:
1. When the authenticity of a quotation is in question, the burden of proof is on the user, not on the questioner.
2. Quotes/ documents should never be used unless they can be documented. The following list of quotations/ documents are coded in this manner:
C = Certain that the quote is fake.
P = Probable that the quote is fake.
Q = Questionable that the quote is real.
D = Distortion--words left out, changed or added; not in context.

-415-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nazis, Communists, Klansmen, and Others on the Fringe: Political Extremism in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 530

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.