Sectors of American Judaism: Reform, Orthodoxy, Conservatism, and Reconstructionism

By Jacob Neusner | Go to book overview

21
ORTHODOX SECTARIANS

CHARLES S. LIEBMAN

We have emphasized the variety and diversity exhibited by Orthodox Judaism in America. Let us now turn to a description of one important source of that variety, called by Professor Liebman "sectarian." This is the world of the yeshivas referred to by Rabbi Fasman and to be discussed by Rabbi Rackman as well. It is a world in which there is no tension whatever between American life and Judaism, because the definition of everyday reality derives wholly from the Jewish context, social, religious, and even economic. Professor Liebman here describes the yeshiva world and its origins, the National Society for Hebrew Day Schools, which serves the burgeoning day school movement in American Judaism and hardly is comparable to the "sects" of the title, and various rabbinical groups.

Still another phenomenon comes under examination, the various Hasidic groups and communities. While one may call these "sects," they often seem to constitute those very self-contained communities for which the Reform spokesmen appeal. They are, in the main, simply congregations, though the Lubavitch Movement is a family of such congregations.

In all, before us are various sorts or expressions of Orthodoxy, yeshivas, national organizations, communities. They are not wholly comparable to one another. What they have in common is a certain distance from the intellectual and cultural world of those Orthodox Jews, here represented by Rabbi Fasman, Rabbi Berkovits, and Rabbi Rackman, who deny one has to choose between Judaism and American civilization.

Jewish sectarianism, unlike that of many Protestant groups, results not from the beliefs of the membership but mostly from a differing strategy as to the best way of maintaining the tradition. Thus, an organization such as Agudath Israel, which is essentially a sectarian group in the United States````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````, was deeply involved in problems and activities of a Jewish and even a general political nature in Eastern Europe. In the United States, on the other hand, they have felt that communal participation with other Jewish groups would perforce in-

-155-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sectors of American Judaism: Reform, Orthodoxy, Conservatism, and Reconstructionism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 328

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.