XVII EDWARD MARTIN TABER

THERE died at Washington, Conn., in September, 1896, an American artist, Edward Martin Taber, who possessed something like genius, but of whose history and work the world at large knows next to nothing. M health was his portion, even in youth, and all of his thirty-three years of life appear to have been occupied in a struggle with death. Neither Europe nor the South gave him the strength he craved, but some comfort and respite he found at Stowe, in Vermont, where he ultimately made his home. There he painted, using the knowledge that he had gained under Abbott Thayer long before, but using even more a certain instinctive gift. There, too, he saturated himself in nature and jotted down his observations of her traits. These memoranda of his, with a few letters and verses, were brought together in a book called "Stowe Notes," the fragmentary text being accompanied by numerous reproductions of his paintings and drawings. The volume is a precious souvenir of a remarkable artistic personality.

In spite of Swinburne's dictum that there could be no such thing as an inarticulate poet or an armless painter, we cannot but recognize the appearance from time to time of a man who is an artist regardless of

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American Artists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • I- a Critic''s Point of View 1
  • I- a Critic''s Point of View 3
  • II- Abbott Thayer 25
  • III- Thomas W. Dewing 47
  • IV- George Fuller 57
  • IV- George Fuller 59
  • V- George de Forest Brush 69
  • VI- Thomas Eakins 77
  • VII- Kenyon Cox 85
  • VIII- Poets in Paint 91
  • IX- American Art Out-Of-Doors 107
  • IX- American Art Out-Of-Doors 109
  • X- The Lure of Technic 155
  • X- The Lure of Technic 157
  • XI- The Slashing Stroke 171
  • XI- The Slashing Stroke 173
  • XII- Women in Impressionism 181
  • XII- Women in Impressionism 183
  • XIII- Edwin A. Abbey as a Mural Painter 193
  • XIII- Edwin A. Abbey as a Mural Painter 195
  • XIV- Frederic Remington 227
  • XV- Frank Millet 247
  • XVI- James Wall Finn 255
  • XVII- Edward Martin Taber 263
  • XVIII- Five Sculptors 267
  • XVIII- Five Sculptors 269
  • XIX- Stanford White 295
  • XX- The American Academy in Rome 305
  • XXI- New York as an Art Centre 315
  • XXIII- The Freer Gallery 343
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