1700: Scenes from London Life

By Maureen Waller | Go to book overview

Notes
Foreword
1the chiefest emporium. Edward Chamberlayne , Angliae Notitia, or the Present State of England ( London, 1700).
1As slow as a Paul's workman. Ned Ward , The London Spy: the Vanities and Vices of the Town Exposed to View ( London, 1927).
1like a floating forest. This is Nicolas Barbon description of the river traffic in A Discourse of Trade ( London, 1690).
4a few fishermen's houses. Celia Fiennes , The Journeys of Celia Fiennes ( London, 1947).
4a large town. Ibid.
4one of the greatest. Daniel Defoe, A Tour through the Whole Island of Great Britain ( London, 1971).
6people here are so little sensible. William III to Antonious Heinsius, 23 November 1700, Archives ou correspondance inedité de la maison d'Orange-Nassau, 3rd series 1689-1702, edited by F. J.L. Kramer , 3 vols ( Leiden 1907-9) p. 249.
1Marriage
9discarded guts and offal. See Jonathan Swift, Dean of St Patrick, A Description of a City Shower in Gulliver's Travels and Selected Writings in Prose and Verse ( London, 1990), p. 754.
9brawling concert of fishwives. Tom Brown, Amusements Serious and Comical for the Meridian of London & Letters from the Dead to the Living ( London, 1927).
9Marriages Perform'd Within. Quoted in Lawrence Stone, The Family, Sex and Marriage in England 1500-1800 ( London, 1990), p. 32.
9Sir, will you be pleased. Quoted in John Ashton, The Fleet: Its River, Prison and Marriages ( London, 1888), p. 340.
10goes at large . . . a very wicked man. Ashton, The Fleet, pp. 337, 338.
102,251 marriages. See Roger Brown , "'The Rise and Fall of the Fleet Marriages'" in R. B.Outhwaite, ed., Marriage and Society, Studies in the Social History of Marriage ( London, 1981) p. 123.
11without loss of time. Quoted in Peter Earle, The Making of the English Middle Class, Business, Society and Family Life in London, 1660-1730( London, 1989) p.178.

-351-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
1700: Scenes from London Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword 1
  • Chapter One - Marriage 9
  • Chapter Two - Childbirth 45
  • Chapter Three - Chapter 62
  • Chapter Four - Disease 81
  • Chapter Five - Death 108
  • Chapter Six - the Home 124
  • Chapter Seven - Fashion 153
  • Chapter Eight Food and Drink 177
  • Chapter Nine Coffee-Houses, Clubs, Alehouses and Taverns 195
  • Chapter Ten Amusements 217
  • Chapter Eleven the Working City 234
  • Chapter Twelve the Poor 257
  • Chapter Thirteen Huguenots and Other Strangers 265
  • Chapter Fourteen Religion and Superstition 282
  • Chapter Fifteen Prostitution and Vice 293
  • Chapter Sixteen Crime and Punishment 307
  • Bibliography 333
  • Notes 351
  • Index 379
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 390

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.