John Marshall and International Law: Statesman and Chief Justice

By Frances Howell Rudko | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

For the preparation of this work, I am indebted to the staffs of the law libraries at The Ohio State University School of Law in Columbus, Ohio, and the University of Arkansas School of Law in Fayetteville, Arkansas, and to the librarians of the William Oxley Thompson Library at The Ohio State University and the Mullins Library at the University of Arkansas. Archivists of the Virginia State Library and the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond, Virginia, the Earl Gregg Swem Library of The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, the National Archives and the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., and The Pierpont Morgan Library in New York City were especially helpful. Professors James S. Chase and Willard B. Gatewood of the History Department at the University of Arkansas read and made valuable suggestions as did the editorial personnel at Greenwood Press. Mildred Vasan and Catherine Lyons of Greenwood Press deserve special thanks as does Rebecca Bennett of New York City who contributed so much to the final form of the manuscript.

Scholarly interest in the history of international law has been intense during certain periods, and significant publications have appeared sporadically since the late eighteenth century. I am indebted to this scholarship and have noted it throughout the text. The exploration of this fascinating aspect of the work of John Marshall was also enhanced by exhaustive current volumes. The editors of The Papers of John Marshall and the authors of the Marshall era in the Oliver Wendell Holmes Devise History of the Supreme Court contributed immeasurably to meaningful study, as did the excellent research facilities at The Ohio State University.

-xi-

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John Marshall and International Law: Statesman and Chief Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 6
  • 2 - Attorney and Federalist 11
  • Notes 37
  • 3 - Minister to France 47
  • Notes 73
  • 4 - United States Representative 83
  • 5 - Secretary of State 97
  • Notes 114
  • 6 - Conclusion 121
  • Notes 123
  • Bibliography 125
  • Index 139
  • About the Author 147
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