John Marshall and International Law: Statesman and Chief Justice

By Frances Howell Rudko | Go to book overview

5
Secretary of State

President Adams appointed Marshall Secretary of State as the result of an upheaval in his administration. Adams restructured his cabinet late in the spring of 1800 in order to rid it of those who, more loyal to Alexander Hamilton than to himself, had been undermining his policies. 1 He angrily confronted Secretary of War James McHenry on May 5 and accused him of subservience to Hamilton. On May 10, Adams requested the resignation of Secretary of State Timothy Pickering. McHenry resigned, but Pickering refused. On May 12, Adams discharged Pickering and placed Marshall's nomination before the Senate. The Senate confirmed the nomination on May 13. Thus, as Albert J. Beveridge writes, the "Federalist Cabinet was broken to pieces, and a presidential election was at hand which would settle the fate of the first great political party in American history."2

When the Federalist Party split, Marshall "bolted the party to stand with Adams" during the last months of his administration. 3 Marshall consistently endorsed both the Washington and Adams administrations, particularly in regard to foreign policy. The split within the party had an immediate impact on the election. Diplomatic historian Alexander DeConde concluded that "Adams's insistence on carrying out his policy of peace in defiance of the Hamiltonians helped turn the campaign of 1800 into a fierce, mudslinging battle in which the two wings of the Federalist party became more bitter in their denunciations of each other than in their attacks on the Republicans." 4

Marshall left Philadelphia in early May to return to Richmond, where he found the political winds none too favorable. 5 He did not leave the capital, however, before he refused the position of Secretary of War. When he learned later that his nomination as Secretary of State had been confirmed, he carefully considered whether he should accept the assignment. He weighed his decision

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Marshall and International Law: Statesman and Chief Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 6
  • 2 - Attorney and Federalist 11
  • Notes 37
  • 3 - Minister to France 47
  • Notes 73
  • 4 - United States Representative 83
  • 5 - Secretary of State 97
  • Notes 114
  • 6 - Conclusion 121
  • Notes 123
  • Bibliography 125
  • Index 139
  • About the Author 147
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 150

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.