The Writing Life of Hugh Kelly: Politics, Journalism, and Theater in Late-Eighteenth-Century London

By Robert R. Bataille | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This study was completed with the help of a considerable number of fellow scholars. Throughout my work, I have been indebted to several who have written dissertations about Kelly: to William W. Watt, Thomas K. O'Leary, and Jean-Michel Lacroix I owe much. Among others who responded to specific requests were Bertram Davis, who kindly answered my inquiries concerning the intersection of Sir John Hawkins's and Kelly's legal careers; James Aikman Cochrane, who aided my search for further connections between Kelly and William Strahan; Samuel H. Woods Jr., who responded to my queries concerning the nature of the Goldsmith-Kelly relationship; and John C. Greene, who graciously made his work on the eighteenth-century Irish theater calendar available to me. My colleague William McCarthy read early versions of the first three chapters and suggested valuable changes. Larry Carver and Betty Rizzo read the entire draft of the study; I owe much to their judicious criticism and kindly encouragement. Betty Rizzo has been especially helpful to me over many years.

A number of libraries here and in the United Kingdom have allowed me to use their collections. Among these were the British Library, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Bodleian Library at Oxford, and the Cambridge University Library. I have also benefited from research carried out at the Princeton University Library during a summer spent at an NEH seminar led by Alvin Kernan and at the University of Pennsylvania Library during another NEH seminar led by John Richetti. At the Harvard Theatre Collection, I was kindly allowed to read a number of rare materials related to the Kelly-Garrick connection, while the Spencer Library at the University of Kansas and the Department of Special Collections at the University of Illinois Library permitted me to consult their extensive holdings on the eighteenth century. Early in my work, I consulted materials at the Boston Public Library, the New York Public Library, and the Library Company of Philadelphia. The copies of Kelly's plays from the Larpent Collection at the Henry E. Huntington Library in Pasadena were invaluable in my attempt to compare the acted with the printed versions of his plays. Finally, I would especially like to thank the interlibrary loan staff of the Parks Library of Iowa State University; they searched far and wide for rare materials, usually with a high degree of success and always with good humor.

-xi-

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