A More Perfect Union: The Impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on the Constitution

By Harold M. Hyman | Go to book overview

Chapter VIII
The Adequate Constitution

I n 1861, only wild seers prophesied total defeat for the Confederacy. The United States government appeared to be strangling in negatives which Chief Justice Taney and others wove around the 1787 Constitution. Taken together with the amassing of northern armies and the absence of further secessions, Lincoln's tenacity gave the lie to critics here and abroad who had concluded that federalism and democracy could not cope with crisis. A global audience was impressed by these evidences of vigor and resilience. Americans were assembling armies large even by the Old World's standards and supplying them without strain; impressive feats in the light of Crimean War history. Manifestations of power were better understood than the weakness of the secession winter.1

By the War's first summer it was apparent that auguries of immediate disaster for the Union were wrong. Despite Cassandracries about the Constitution's defectiveness, democracy's rottenness, and federalism's fantasticality, America was thriving. Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill, among many others, sensed that the new, vital element in the world that America represented was not dead after all.2

____________________
1
Donaldson Jordan and Edwin J. Pratt, Europe and the American Civil War ( Boston, 1931), 11-12; Goldwin Smith, A Letter to a Whig Member of the Southern Independence Association ( Boston, 1864), 14; Auguste Laugel, The United States During the Civil War, ed. Allan Nevins ( Bloomington, 1961), 186-8.
2
Gerald Runkle, "Karl Marx and the American Civil War," Comparative Studies in Society and History, VI ( 1964), 121; Mill to Henry Villard, Jan. 26, 1870 in JSS, V ( 1873), 138; Heard Round the World, ed. Harold M. Hyman ( New York, 1969), passim; Carl J. Friedrich, The Impact of American Constitutionalism Abroad ( Boston, 1967), 5.

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A More Perfect Union: The Impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on the Constitution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 588

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.