Sherman and His Campaigns a Military Biography

By S. M. Bowman; R. B. Irwin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V.
CORINTH.

IMMEDIATELY after the battle of Shiloh, Major-General Halleck left Saint Louis, proceeded to Pittsburgh Landing, and there took personal command of the forces, which he caused to be reinforced from other parts of his department. Major- General Pope was placed in command of the left wing, Major- General Buell of the centre, Major-General Thomas of the right wing, and Major-General McClernand of the reserve, while Major-General Grant was assigned, by General Halleck, to nominal duty as second in command.

After his repulse at Shiloh, Beauregard concentrated his army at Corinth, and, strongly fortifying that position, and summoning to his aid all the available troops in the southwest, including the armies of Price and Van Dorn, from Missouri and Arkansas, as well as the militia of the States of Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, prepared for a determined defence. "Soldiers of Shiloh and Elkhorn!" he said to his troops, "we are about to meet once more in the shock of battle the invaders of our soil, the despoilers of our homes, the disturbers of our family ties, face to face, hand to hand. . . . With your mingled banners, for the first time during this war, we shall meet the foe in strength that should give us victory. Soldiers, can the result be doubtful? Shall we not drive back into Tennessee the presumptuous mercenaries collected for our subjugation? One more manly effort, and, trusting in God and the justness of our cause, we shall recover more than we have lately lost."

Bragg, too, addressed his men in the same strain, telling them: "You will encounter him in your chosen position, strong

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