The National Administration of the United States of America

By John A. Fairlie | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

References .-- GAILLARD HUNT: The Department of State.-- W. H. MICHAEL : History of the Department of State.-- E. SCHUYLER: American Diplomacy, chs. 1-3.-- A. B. HART: Actual Government, pp. 430- 445.-- S. B. CRANDALL: Treaties, Their Making and Their Enforcement ( Columbia University studies in Political Science, Vol. 21).


DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE

Atlantic Monthly, 29:300; 74:241; 85:455, 669.-- North American Review, 122:309; 156:461; 158:412; 159:711; 162:274; 169:349.-- Political Science Quarterly, 13:19.-- Century, 26:306; 38:268.-- Forum, 4:519; 6:486; 15:163; 22:673; 25:546, 702; 27:24; 30:28; 32:488.-- American Historical Association, Report for 1898, p. 285.

IN the administrative organization of the United States national government, the department of State corresponds most closely to the department of Foreign Affairs in other governments. But the department of State is not exclusively charged with matters pertaining to foreign relations. It has also duties analogous to the keeper of the seal, and still others which correspond in a slight degree to those of a home department or department of the interior in European governments.

The fact that relations with foreign countries were necessary was recognized early in our history. Even before the Revolution several of the colonies maintained representatives in England who interested themselves in securing for their constituents favorable legislation, commercial and otherwise, and secured protection to their fellow citizens who might be traveling abroad. In this character Franklin at one time represented several colonies. With the advent of the Continental Congress the foreign relations of the colonies were entrusted to committees called the Secret Committee of Correspondence and

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