The National Administration of the United States of America

By John A. Fairlie | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

References.-- J. S. EASBY-SMITH: The Department of Justice.--Opinions of the Attorney-General of the United States.--American and English Encyclopedia of Law, I, 974; V, 713--Cyclopedia of Law and Procedure, IV, 11024.--American Law Register, 5:65.--Law Reporter, 13:373; Copp's Land Owner, 3:54, 57.--American Law Review, 21:779.

THE department of Justice has been developed from the English office of attorney-general, with important features added in the course of American experience. As early as the reign of Edward I, almost contemporaneous with the appear- ance of a special legal profession in England, we find Crown attorneys (Attornati Regis) employed for guarding the royal privileges in the courts. By the time of Edward IV the offi- cial title of attorney-general appears for the first time. A little later, as the distinction between barristers and solicitors became established, the Crown lawyers are distinguished as the King's attorney and the King's solicitor.1

These law officers acted as the legal advisers of the King and his ministers, and also conducted public prosecutions in impor- tant criminal cases. But there was not developed, and has not yet developed, in England any system of local public pros- ecutors. Nor has the English attorney-general become one of the leading political officials with a seat in the cabinet, since political and administrative functions, which have become attached to the office in this country are there performed by the lord chancellor and other official.2

Most of the colonies had attorneys-general; and these officers

____________________
1
Gneist, History of the English Constitution, ch. 22.
2
Anson, Law and Custom of the Constitution, II, 201.

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The National Administration of the United States of America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 274

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.