Chain of Change: Struggles for Black Community Development

By Mel King | Go to book overview

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
AFL-CIO American Federation of Labor-Congress
Of Industrial Organizations
AGC Associated General Contractors
APAC Area Planning Council
BAG Boston Action Group
BHA Boston Housing Authority
BJC Boston Jobs Coalition
BPO Boston Peoples Organization
BRA Boston Redevelopment Authority
BSF Black Student Federation
BSU Black Student Union
BUF Black United Front
BURP Boston Urban Renewal Program
CAB Contractors Association of Boston
CATA Columbus Ave. Tenants Association
CAUSE Community Assembly for a United South End
CDFC Community Development Finance Corp.
CEC Community Education Council
CEDAC Community Econ. Development Assist. Corp.
CIRCLE Centralized Investments to Revitalize
Community Living Effectively
CORE Congress of Racial Equality
CBPS Citizens For Boston Public Schools
DES Division of Employment Security
DOL Department of Labor, U.S.
DPW Department of Public Works
ETC Emergency Tenants Council
FHA Federal Housing Authority
FUND Fund for Urban Negro Development
HEW Health, Education & Welfare, U.S. Dept. of
HUD Housing and Urban Development, U.S. Dept of
IBAIniquilinos Boricuas en Accion
LRCC Lower Roxbury Community Corp.
MAW Mothers for Adequate Welfare
MCAD Mass. Commission Against Discrimination
MDTA Manpower Development Training Act

-xiii-

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