Existentialism and Psychiatry: Four Lectures

By Rudolf Allers | Go to book overview

AUTHOR'S FOREWORD

T HESE LECTURES were delivered at the Institute of Living, Hartford, Conn., in March, 1959. My profound gratitude is due to Dr. Francis J. Braceland, Director of the Institute of Living, for having extended to me this invitation and for kindly contributing the preface.*

The form in which these lectures are printed here is almost the same as that in which they were delivered. A few passages have been added to render clearer one point or the other and to introduce some questions which had to be left out because of lack of time. The notes contain some bibliographical references and a few remarks on side issues which would have been out of place in the text but seemed to deserve mentioning. The bibliography lists the main works from which further information may be gathered on existentialism in general and on its significance for psychiatry in particular.

It is not customary nor in good taste that an author talk of himself. His words speak for him. If I venture, nevertheless, to say a few words about myself, it is, so to speak, to present my credentials.

A long life has afforded me the opportunity to witness the most important developments both in philosophy and psychiatry. I have attended what was, I believe, the last course Freud gave at the Medical School of Vienna and I have witnessed the transformation of psychiatry wrought by the impact of psychoanalysis. A student under Wagner von Jauregg, assistant at the clinics of Arnold Pick and Emil Kraepelin, later in charge of the department for neurophysiology and medical

____________________
*
The expression of my gratitude is also due to Professor Paul Sullivan, of the Department of English at Georgetown University who graciously consented to revise the text.

-ix-

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