sacrifice ahead. And in sacrifice she was proud, in renunciation she was strong, for she did not trust herself to support everyday life. She was prepared for the big things and the deep things, like tragedy. It was the sufficiency of the small day-life she could not trust.

The Easter holidays began happily. Paul was his own frank self. Yet she felt it would go wrong. On the Sunday afternoon she stood at her bedroom window, looking across at the oak-trees of the wood, in whose branches a twilight was tangled, below the bright sky of the afternoon. Grey-green rosettes of honeysuckle leaves hung before the window, some already, she fancied, showing bud. It was spring, which she loved and dreaded.

Hearing the clack of the gate she stood in suspense. It was a bright grey day. Paul came into the yard with his bicycle, which glittered as he walked. Usually he rang his bell and laughed towards the house. To-day he walked with shut lips and cold, cruel bearing, that had something of a slouch and a sneer in it. She knew him well by now, and could tell from that keen-looking, aloof young body of his what was happening inside him. There was a cold correctness in the way he put his bicycle in its place, that made her heart sink.

She came downstairs nervously. She was wearing a new net blouse that she thought became her. It had a high collar with a tiny ruff, reminding her of Mary, Queen of Scots, and making her, she thought, look wonderfully a woman, and dignified. At twenty she was full-breasted and luxuriously formed. Her face was still like a soft rich mask, unchangeable. But her eyes, once lifted, were wonderful. She was afraid of him. He would notice her new blouse.

He, being in a hard, ironical mood, was entertaining the family to a description of a service given in the Primitive Methodist Chapel, conducted by one of the well-known preachers of the sect. He sat at the head of the table, his mobile face, with the eyes that could be so beautiful, shining with tenderness or dancing with laughter, now taking on one expression and then another, in imitation of various people he was mocking. His mockery always hurt her; it was too near the reality. He was too clever and cruel. She felt that when his eyes were like this, hard with mocking hate, he would spare neither himself nor anybody else. But Mrs. Leivers was wiping her eyes with laughter, and Mr. Leivers, just awake from his Sunday nap, was rubbing his head in amusement. The

-227-

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Sons and Lovers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter I - The Early Married Life of the Morels 3
  • Chapter II - The Birth of Paul, and Another Battle 30
  • Chapter III - The Casting off of Morel-- the Taking on of William 49
  • Chapter IV - The Young Life of Paul 61
  • Chapter V - Paul Launches into Life 88
  • Chapter VI - Death in the Family 119
  • Part Two 149
  • Chapter VII - Lad-And-Girl Love 151
  • Chapter VIII - Strife in Love 190
  • Chapter IX - Defeat of Miriam 227
  • Chapter X - Clara 265
  • Chapter XI - The Test on Miriam 291
  • Chapter XII - Passion 314
  • Chapter XIII - Baxter Dawes 355
  • Chapter XIV - The Release 394
  • Chapter XV - Derelict 426
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