and won in both of them. And with her he felt it so hard to overcome; yet he was nearest to her, and with her alone could he deliberately break through. And he owed himself to her. Then, if they could get things right, they could marry; but he would not marry unless he could feel strong in the joy of it--never. He could not have faced his mother. It seemed to him that to sacrifice himself in a marriage he did not want would be degrading, and would undo all his life, make it a nullity. He would try what he could do.

And he had a great tenderness for Miriam. Always, she was sad, dreaming her religion; and he was nearly a religion to her. He could not bear to fail her. It would all come right if they tried.

He looked round. A good many of the nicest men he knew were like himself, bound in by their own virginity, which they could not break out of. They were so sensitive to their women that they would go without them for ever rather than do them a hurt, an injustice. Being the sons of mothers whose husbands had blundered rather brutally through their feminine sanctities, they were themselves too diffident and shy. They could easier deny themselves than incur any reproach from a woman; for a woman was like their mother, and they were full of the sense of their mother. They preferred themselves to suffer the misery of celibacy, rather than risk the other person.

He went back to her. Something in her, when he looked at her, brought the tears almost to his eyes. One day he stood behind her as she sang. Annie was playing a song on the piano. As Miriam sang her mouth seemed hopeless. She sang like a nun singing to heaven. It reminded him so much of the mouth and eyes of one who sings beside a Botticelli Madonna, so spiritual. Again, hot as steel, came up the pain in him. Why must he ask her for the other thing? Why was there his blood battling with her? If only he could have been always gentle, tender with her, breathing with her the atmosphere of reverie and religious dreams, he would give his right hand. It was not fair to hurt her. There seemed an eternal maidenhood about her; and when he thought of her mother, he saw the great brown eyes of a maiden who was nearly scared and shocked out of her virgin maidenhood, but not quite, in spite of her seven children. They had been born almost leaving her out of count, not of her, but upon her. So she could never let them go, because she never had possessed them.

-291-

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Sons and Lovers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter I - The Early Married Life of the Morels 3
  • Chapter II - The Birth of Paul, and Another Battle 30
  • Chapter III - The Casting off of Morel-- the Taking on of William 49
  • Chapter IV - The Young Life of Paul 61
  • Chapter V - Paul Launches into Life 88
  • Chapter VI - Death in the Family 119
  • Part Two 149
  • Chapter VII - Lad-And-Girl Love 151
  • Chapter VIII - Strife in Love 190
  • Chapter IX - Defeat of Miriam 227
  • Chapter X - Clara 265
  • Chapter XI - The Test on Miriam 291
  • Chapter XII - Passion 314
  • Chapter XIII - Baxter Dawes 355
  • Chapter XIV - The Release 394
  • Chapter XV - Derelict 426
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