edge of his new acquaintance's art. The applied arts interested him very much. At the same time he laboured slowly at his pictures. He loved to paint large figures, full of light, but not merely made up of lights and cast shadows, like the impressionists; rather definite figures that had a certain luminous quality, like some of Michael Angelo's people. And these he fitted into a landscape, in what he thought true proportion. He worked a great deal from memory, using everybody he knew. He believed firmly in his work, that it was good and valuable. In spite of fits of depression, shrinking, everything, he believed in his work.

He was twenty-four when he said his first confident thing to his mother.

"Mother," he said, "I s'll make a painter that they'll attend to."

She sniffed in her quaint fashion. It was like a half-pleased shrug of the shoulders.

"Very well, my boy, we'll see," she said.

"You shall see, my pigeon! You see if you're not swanky one of these days!"

"I'm quite content, my boy," she smiled.

"But you'll have to alter. Look at you with Minnie!"

Minnie was the small servant, a girl of fourteen.

"And what about Minnie?" asked Mrs. Morel, with dignity.

"I heard her this morning: 'Eh, Mrs. Morel! I was going to do that,' when you went out in the rain for some coal," he said. "That looks a lot like your being able to manage servants!"

"Well, it was only the child's niceness," said Mrs. Morel.

"And you apologising to her: 'You can't do two things at once, can you?'"

"She was busy washing up," replied Mrs. Morel.

"And what did she say? 'It could easy have waited a bit. Now look how your feet paddle!'"

"Yes--brazen young baggage!" said Mrs. Morel, smiling.

He looked at his mother, laughing. She was quite warm and rosy again with love of him. It seemed as if all the sunshine were on her for a moment. He continued his work gladly. She seemed so well when she was happy that he forgot her grey hair.

And that year she went with him to the Isle of Wight for a holiday. It was too exciting for them both, and too beautiful. Mrs. Morel was full of joy and wonder. But he would have her

-314-

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Sons and Lovers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter I - The Early Married Life of the Morels 3
  • Chapter II - The Birth of Paul, and Another Battle 30
  • Chapter III - The Casting off of Morel-- the Taking on of William 49
  • Chapter IV - The Young Life of Paul 61
  • Chapter V - Paul Launches into Life 88
  • Chapter VI - Death in the Family 119
  • Part Two 149
  • Chapter VII - Lad-And-Girl Love 151
  • Chapter VIII - Strife in Love 190
  • Chapter IX - Defeat of Miriam 227
  • Chapter X - Clara 265
  • Chapter XI - The Test on Miriam 291
  • Chapter XII - Passion 314
  • Chapter XIII - Baxter Dawes 355
  • Chapter XIV - The Release 394
  • Chapter XV - Derelict 426
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