Following the Equator: A Journey around the World - Vol. 2

By Mark Twain | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII

Hunger is the handmaid of genius-- Pudd'nhead Wilson New Calender.

O NE day during our stay in Bombay there was a criminal trial of a most interesting sort, a terribly realistic chapter out of the Arabian Nights, a strange mixture of simplicities and pieties and murderous practicalities, which brought back the forgotten days of Thuggee and made them live again; in fact, even made them believable. It was a case where a young girl had been assassinated for the sake of her trifling ornaments, things not worth a laborer's day's wages in America. This thing could have been done in many other countries, but hardly with the cold business-like depravity, absence of fear, absence of caution, destitution of the sense of horror, repentance, remorse, exhibited in this case. Elsewhere the murderer would have done his crime secretly, by night, and without witnesses; his fears would have allowed him no peace while the dead body was in his neighborhood; he would not have rested until he had gotten it safe out of the way and hidden as effectually as he could hide it. But this Indian murderer does his deed in the full light of day, cares nothing for the society of witnesses, is in no way incommoded by the presence of the corpse, takes his own time about disposing

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Following the Equator: A Journey around the World - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Following the Equator 1
  • Chapter II 13
  • Chapter V 48
  • Chapter VI 57
  • Chapter VII 64
  • Chapter IX 84
  • Chapter X 98
  • Chapter XI 112
  • Chapter XII 125
  • Chapter XIII 137
  • Chapter XIV 153
  • Chapter XVI 173
  • Chapter XVII 185
  • Chapter XX 215
  • Chapter XXI 223
  • Chapter XXII 230
  • Chapter XXIV 261
  • Chapter XXV 273
  • Chapter XVII 285
  • Chapter XXVII 297
  • Chapter XXVIII 306
  • Chapter XXIX 318
  • Chapter XXX 327
  • Chapter XXXI 338
  • Chapter XXXII 354
  • Chapter XXXIII 366
  • Conclusion 379
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