Following the Equator: A Journey around the World - Vol. 2

By Mark Twain | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXI

First catch your Boer, then kick him.-- Pudd'nhead Wilson New Calendar.

T HOSE latter days were days of bitter worry and trouble for the harassed Reformers.

From Mrs. Hammond we learn that on the (31st (the day after Johannesburg heard of the invasion), "the Reform Committee repudiates Dr. Jameson's inroad."

It also publishes its intention to adhere to the Manifesto.

It also earnestly desires that the inhabitants shall refrain from overt acts against the Boer Government.

It also "distributes arms" at the Court House, and furnishes horses "to the newly enrolled volunteers."

It also brings a Transvaal flag into the committee- room, and the entire body swear allegiance to it "with uncovered heads and upraised arms."

Also "one thousand Lee-Metford rifles have been given out"--to rebels.

Also, in a speech, Reformer Lionel Phillips informs the public that the Reform Committee Delegation has "been received with courtesy by the Government Commission," and "been assured that their proposals shall be earnestly considered." That "while the Reform Committee regretted Jameson's precipitate action, they would stand by him."

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Following the Equator: A Journey around the World - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Following the Equator 1
  • Chapter II 13
  • Chapter V 48
  • Chapter VI 57
  • Chapter VII 64
  • Chapter IX 84
  • Chapter X 98
  • Chapter XI 112
  • Chapter XII 125
  • Chapter XIII 137
  • Chapter XIV 153
  • Chapter XVI 173
  • Chapter XVII 185
  • Chapter XX 215
  • Chapter XXI 223
  • Chapter XXII 230
  • Chapter XXIV 261
  • Chapter XXV 273
  • Chapter XVII 285
  • Chapter XXVII 297
  • Chapter XXVIII 306
  • Chapter XXIX 318
  • Chapter XXX 327
  • Chapter XXXI 338
  • Chapter XXXII 354
  • Chapter XXXIII 366
  • Conclusion 379
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