Women in Communication: A Biographical Sourcebook

By Nancy D. Signorielli | Go to book overview

RUTH FRANKLIN CRANE (1902-1989)

Norma Pecora

What would a modern woman do without a radio set! As soon as a new idea in foods, or fashions, or home management comes along, it's incorporated in some one of the many women's programs. There are many, many women whose work it is to see that these new ideas are spread.

Sometimes these unknowns of the air become as familiar to them as family friends. ( Sharman, 1930)

"Mrs. Page " of "Mrs. Page's Household Economies," for almost ten years, was a broadcasting pioneer named Ruth Crane. 1 The program was a combination of what we would now define as product endorsements or perhaps program- length "infomercials" and advice for the American woman on how to use the myriad of new consumer products available in the 1920s and 1930s--as well as a friendly voice into her kitchen.

An often overlooked form of broadcast programming, women's service programs like "Mrs. Page's Home Economies" brought information and companionship to the woman at home. Defined as the "housewife's electronic liberator" (in Rouse, 1979), the tradition of these programs has continued with network programs such as "Good Morning America" ( ABC), "Today" ( NBC), and "This Morning" ( CBS) and local or cable programming and syndicated shows like "Working Women" ( Allbritton Television). Generally scheduled in the morning or early afternoon hours, these shows had, and still have, several advantages. First, they tend to be "budgetless" (Accomplishments, n.d.) and, second, they offer a niche audience of consumers to advertisers ( Meehan, 1993;

-79-

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Women in Communication: A Biographical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Contributors xi
  • Foreword xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction xix
  • References xxiv
  • Mary Clemmer Ames (1831-1884) 1
  • References 6
  • Sandra Jean Ball-Rokeach (1941- ) 8
  • References 18
  • Margaret Bourke-White (1904-1971) 20
  • References 29
  • Helen Gurley Brown (1922- ) 31
  • References 38
  • Judee K. Burgoon (1948-) 40
  • References 47
  • Joanne Cantor (1945- ) 50
  • References 58
  • Peggy Charren (1928- ) 60
  • Constance (connie) Yu-Hwa Chung (1946- ) 66
  • References 77
  • Ruth Franklin Crane (1902-1989) 79
  • Notes 89
  • Dorothy Day (1897-1980) 92
  • Conclusion 101
  • Brenda L. Dervin (1938- ) 103
  • Author's Note 115
  • Nancy Dickerson (1927- ) 118
  • References 123
  • Dorothy Dix (elizabeth Meriwether Gilmer) (1861-1951) 124
  • References 134
  • Elaine Goodale Eastman (1863-1953) 135
  • References 140
  • Mary Anne Fitzpatrick (1949- ) 142
  • References 150
  • Pauline Frederick (1908-1990) 151
  • References 154
  • Ellen Goodman (1941- ) 155
  • References 160
  • Doris Appel Graber (1923- ) 162
  • References 171
  • Katharine Graham (1917- ) 173
  • References 186
  • Sarah Josepha Buell Hale (1788-1879) 188
  • References 199
  • Herta Herzog (1910- ) 202
  • Marguerite Higgins (1920-1966) 212
  • References 214
  • Hilde Himmelweit (1918-1989) 216
  • References 219
  • Aletha C. Huston (1939- ) 220
  • References 225
  • Kathleen Hall Jamieson (1946- ) 228
  • References 234
  • Jean Kilbourne (1943- ) 236
  • Career Development 242
  • Dorothy Mae Kilgallen (1913-1965) 243
  • References 252
  • Gladys Engel Lang (1919- ) 254
  • References 262
  • Mary Margaret Mcbride (1889-1976) 264
  • References 271
  • Anne O'Hare Mccormick (1880-1954) 273
  • References 279
  • Sara Miller Mccune (1941- ) 281
  • References 290
  • Margaret L. Mclaughlin (1943- ) 291
  • References 298
  • Elisabeth Noelle-Neumann (1916- ) 300
  • References 309
  • Helen Rogers Reid (1882-1970) 312
  • Note 319
  • Cokie Roberts (4 943- ) 321
  • References 327
  • L. Edna Rogers (1933- ) 328
  • References 336
  • Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) 339
  • References 347
  • Anne Newport Royall (1769-1854) 349
  • References, 358
  • Rebecca Boring Rubin (1948- ) 360
  • References 366
  • Jessica Savitch (1947-1983) 369
  • Selected Bibliography 378
  • Dorothy G. Singer (1927- ) 379
  • References 385
  • Gloria M. Steinem (1934- ) 387
  • References 393
  • Ida Minerva Tarbell - (1857-1944) 394
  • References 404
  • Dorothy Thompson - (1893-1961) 406
  • References 414
  • Judith Cary Waller (1889-1973) 415
  • References 417
  • Barbara Walters (1931- ) 419
  • References 428
  • Ellen Wartella (1949- ) 430
  • References 436
  • Ida B. Wells-Barnett (1862-1931) 438
  • References 442
  • Appendix: Short Biographies of Notable Women in Communication 443
  • Author Index 463
  • Index 469
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