The Need to Give: The Patron and the Arts

By Andrew Sinclair | Go to book overview

7
Its Own Natural Qualities

'I AM SURE that the people of England are likely to be better patrons of art than the English aristocracy ever were, and that the aristocracy have been tried and didn't patronize it.' So the novelist Thackeray observed. In Victorian times, aristocrats were not the friends of genius, as once they had been. Where one citizen had read a century before, now a hundred read and thought. 'The poet and artist is called upon to appeal to the few no longer. His profit and fame are with the many.'

Thackeray was being optimistic. Although the appreciation of art was slowly becoming more widespread, a national Education Act was not passed until 1870. Britain lagged behind the rest of Europe in teaching its children. But the Great Exhibition did set an example, which was taken up in the shires. The pioneer was the Bath and West of England Society. In its show at Barnstaple in 1853, an Arts and Manufactures Department was included. The Department of Science and Art in South Kensington sent down pieces of porcelain and pottery, majolica and faïence, which the rural audience had never seen. The show also displayed a collection of drawings by Turner; some of his relatives still lived in Barnstaple and were artisans rather than artists. In later years, the Bath and West Show presented exhibitions of Holman Hunt and William Frith and Joshua Reynolds. Crowds of country people, the Show's journal reported, 'witnessed perhaps for the first time in their lives those grand works of English art of which this country is so justly proud'.

The Bath and West Show also mounted exhibitions of 'industrial art'. The objects were carefully selected; the functional was held to

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Need to Give: The Patron and the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Dedication v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Chapters *
  • I - The First Patron 1
  • 2 - Destroyers and Preservers 15
  • 3 - Giving to God and Self 29
  • 4 - The Artist, the Patron and the Slave 46
  • 5 - A Sort of Economic Man 58
  • 6 - The Tree of Life, the Tree of Death 75
  • 7 - Its Own Natural Qualities 91
  • 8 - The War to End All Art 106
  • 9 - The Three Cultures 121
  • 10 - The Revolution That Never Could Be 135
  • 11 - The Patrons and the Arts 152
  • 12 - The Patrons of the Message 170
  • Endpiece - We, the Patrons . . . 188
  • Notes 193
  • Index 203
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 210

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.