Unconventional Conflicts in a New Security Era: Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam

By Sam C. Sarkesian | Go to book overview
22.
David Halberstam, The Best and the Brightest ( New York: Random House, 1972), p. 658.
23.
John P. Burke and Fred I. Greenstein, How Presidents Test Reality: Decision on Vietnam, 1954 and 1965 ( New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1989), p. 265.
24.
Dean Rusk, As I Saw It, as told to Richard Rusk, edited by Daniel S. Papp ( New York: Norton, 1990), pp. 428, 430.
25.
James Barber, The Pulse of Politics ( New York: Norton, 1980), pp. 85-86.
26.
Theodore H. White, The Making of the President, 1972 ( New York: Atheneum, 1973), pp. 313-15.
27.
Clinton Rossiter, The American Presidency, rev. ed. ( New York: Mentor Books, 1960), p. 152.
28.
W. W. Rostow, The United States in the World Arena: An Essay in Recent History ( New York: Harper & Row, 1960), pp. 395, 397.
29.
Fred I. Greenstein, The Hidden-Hand Presidency: Eisenhower as Leader ( New York: Basic Books, 1982).
30.
See, for example, Theodore Sorenson, Kennedy ( New York: Bantam Books, 1966); and Arthur Schlesinger Jr., A Thousand Days: John F. Kennedy in the White House ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1965). Some recent accounts dealing with the Kennedy family are not so sympathetic or favorable. See John H. Davis, The Kennedy's Dynasty and Disaster, 1848- 1984 ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1985).
31.
For a less than sympathetic view, see John Blair and Clay Blair Jr., The Search for J.F.K. ( New York: Berkley Medallion Books, 1976). The authors argue that there were a number of omissions and distortions of Kennedy's war record and his health in order to present a more favorable image to the public. See also Thomas C. Reeves, A Question of Character: A Life of John F. Kennedy ( New York: Free Press, 1991).
32.
See notes 30 and 31.
33.
Sorenson, p. 436.
34.
See Richard J. Walton, Cold War and Counterrevolution: The Foreign Policy of John F. Kennedy ( New York: Viking Press, 1972).
35.
Trumbull Higgins, The Perfect Failure: Kennedy, Eisenhower, and the CIA at the Bay of Pigs ( New York: Norton, 1987), p. 175. And as Burke and Greenstein note, much of what Eisenhower had established in the National Security Council was dismantled by Kennedy (p. 135).
36.
John C. Donovan, The Cold Warriors: A Policy-Making Elite ( Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath, 1974), pp. 179-82.
37.
For example, see Schlesinger, p. 550.
38.
Hedrick Smith, "The Kennedy Years, 1961-63", in Neil Sheehan, Hedrick Smith, E. W. Kenworthy , and Fox Butterfield, The Pentagon Papers ( New York: Bantam Books, 1971), p. 84. The more authoritative source is The Pentagon Papers: The Defense Department History of the United States Decision Making on Vietnam: Senator Gravel Edition, 4 vols. ( Boston: Beacon Press, 1971).
39.
An excellent study of the personality, character, and leadership style of presidents Eisenhower and Johnson with respect to decisions on Vietnam is John P. Burke and Fred I. Greenstein , How Presidents Test Reality: Decision on Vietnam, 1954 and 1965 ( New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1989).
41.
George C. Herring, Cold Blood: LBJ's Conduct of Limited War in Vietnam, Harmon Memorial Lectures in Military History, United States Air Force Academy ( Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1990), p. 8.

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Unconventional Conflicts in a New Security Era: Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xi
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Conflict Analysis: The Comparative Framework 3
  • Notes 22
  • Part II - Comparative Analysis 25
  • 2 - The State of the Nation: Great Britain, the United States, and Unconventional Conflicts 27
  • Notes 53
  • 3 - Military Posture and Nature of Conflict: Malaya 55
  • Notes 76
  • 4 - Military Posture and Nature of Conflict: The Diem Period in Vietnam 79
  • Notes 93
  • 5 - Military Posture and Nature of Conflict: The United States and the Second Indo-China War 95
  • Notes 119
  • 6 - Nature of Indigenous Systems: Revolutionary Systems 123
  • Notes 136
  • 7 - Nature of Indigenous Systems: Counterrevolutionary Systems 137
  • Notes 161
  • 8 - Conclusions: Malaya and Vietnam 165
  • Part III - Conclusions: What Needs to Be Done 183
  • 9 - The United States and the Emerging Security Agenda 185
  • Notes 198
  • Selected Bibliography 201
  • Index 217
  • About the Author 227
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