The Anthropology of Medicine: From Culture to Method

By Lola Romanucci-Ross; Daniel E. Moerman et al. | Go to book overview

3
PHANTOMS AND PHYSICIANS: SOCIAL CHANGE THROUGH MEDICAL PLURALISM

LIBBET CRANDON-MALAMUD

Vicente Callisaya, an elderly rural Bolivian Aymara man, was obviously sick in 1977, but everyone in town had a different opinion about what he had. He himself considered all possibilities, and finally determined he had a fatal disease that, according to local belief, affects only Indians. Another opinion was anemia that, consensus had it, cosmopolitan medicine could cure; but he rejected it. Why he made such a choice had little to do with his frame of mind, his access to medicine, or with Aymara beliefs as such. Nor was it due to race, although Doña Teresa, the self-appointed town aristocrat, held that it was. Rather, Vicente's choice was related to the use of the concept of ethnicity and race in Bolivian society and history, and to the use of medicine to create social change.

Doña Teresa's convictions about the "Indian race" are hardly peculiar. In the Bolivian popular mind, as throughout much of the Western world, ethnically defined indigenous populations are considered racially distinct. 1 On those grounds, Indian labor has been exploited since the conquest. Those segments of Bolivian society that have regarded the nation as backward have blamed the lack of national progress on the Indian -- along with U.S. imperialism when the Indian vote was desirable. Although there is much to support the latter assertion, its periodic appearance contrasts with the consistency of the former explanation. 2

This chapter is an expanded version of "Medical Dialogue and the Political Economy of Medical Pluralism: A Case from Rural Highland Bolivia". Reproduced by permission of the American Anthropological Association from American Ethnologist 13( 3) ( August 1986). It includes text from my From the Fat of Our Souls ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991). Clotilde in this chapter is Doña Antonia de Villazon in From the Fat; Vicente Callisaya and Doña Teresa are Edegon and Doña Ana in " Medical Dialogue."

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Anthropology of Medicine: From Culture to Method
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 400

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.