People and Change: An Introduction to Counseling and Stress Management

By Catherine M. Flanagan | Go to book overview

Appendix I
Identifying Problems
and Planning Changes

IDENTIFYING THE PROBLEMS

Very often, when clients are first referred, they are acutely aware that all is not as it should be, but they cannot put their finger on the cause of their unease. Frequently, people complain that they feel nervous, confused, or under pressure. These vague phrases indicate that the source of the discomfort and unhappiness has not been identified; and this ambiguity adds to their distress. The cause of a problem can lie in a person's environment, body, behavior, or thinking. Moreover, frequently what starts off as one problem quickly breeds problems in other areas. The initial problem often gets lost in a web of confusion and increasing stress.

On the other hand, even when people are sure of what their problem is (e.g., "I smoke too much"), they can rarely report the times, places, and context within which the problem occurs, or why. In other words, correctly identifying problems does not mean that the dynamics are also understood. For example, people smoke for a variety of reasons: for the taste of the tobacco, for a food substitute or a tranquilizer under pressure, or simply for something to do with their hands when feeling uncomfortable in company. Most smokers, if asked why they smoke, would probably answer something like: "I just do--I suppose I like it." People are generally unaware of the many factors that influence their behavior; and furthermore, as explained in chapter 1, verbal self-report and introspection are also surprisingly unreliable.

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
People and Change: An Introduction to Counseling and Stress Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - How Problems Develop 7
  • 1 - Learning 9
  • 2 - Sources of Stress 23
  • 3 - The Stress Response 49
  • Part II - Specific Problem Areas 59
  • 4 - Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias 61
  • 5 - Depression 75
  • 6 - Obsessive-Compulsive Problems 85
  • 7 - Relating 95
  • 8 - Marriage 105
  • 9 - Sex 113
  • 10 - Overindulgence 123
  • 11 - Attrition, Adherence, and Relapse 135
  • Appendix I - Identifying Problems and Planning Changes 149
  • Appendix V - Making Changes in Thinking 201
  • References 229
  • Author Index 237
  • Subject Index 245
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 253

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.