Shakespeare's Universal Wolf: Studies in Early Modern Reification

By Hugh L. Grady | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

The initial research for this book was made possible by two awards from Beaver College: the Ellington Beavers Intellectual Inquiry Award and a Faculty Development Fund Award.

Once again my major intellectual (and emotional) collaborator in the writing process has been my wife, Susan Wells, who read and commented on early drafts of several chapters and who discussed many of the book's issues with me. And I want to thank as well Dick Wertime, Max Luria, Walter Cohen, and Terence Hawkes, who each at my request read and commented on an early draft of one or more of the following chapters. My thanks as well to my colleague Shekhar Deshpande for his very helpful conversations with me about the theoretical frame of this work in its formative stages. The book also benefited from the comments, questions, challenges, and encouragement individual portions or summaries of it received at several academic conferences -- at the Seminar on Marxist Discourses co-chaired by Walter Cohen and Susan Wells at the 1991 World Shakespeare Conference at Tokyo; at two seminars of the Shakespeare Association of America in 1992 and 1994 (chaired respectively by Don Wayne and Barbara Bono); at the 1994 MLA Convention Special Session on Genealogies of Differentiation; and at the 1995 Ohio Shakespeare Conference.

Due to the strange opportunities of academic life, I spent academic year 1992-3 teaching and working on this book at the Tokyo campus of Temple University, where I enjoyed the very helpful co-operation of the Temple library staff and the hospitality of the Japanese Shakespearean community. I want particularly to thank Professors Akiko Kusunoki and Edward Tetsuya Motohashi for their many courtesies and acts of kindness in helping to introduce me and my family to Japan as well as in discussing my work, helping me procure books and articles, and introducing me to the larger community of Japanese Shakespeare scholars. I particularly enjoyed and benefited from a discussion of an early version of the Othello chapter by a group of younger Japanese Shakespeareans at Tokyo Metropolitan University in July 1993.

In addition to that discussion, the Othello chapter owes something of its present form to my attempt to respond to the comments of Carol Neely and a second, anonymous reader for a journal to which an early version was submitted. A revised version of that article, making use of some of the material from, the present Chapter 3 and the Conclusion, appears in Criticism (Fall 1995). Similarly, portions of this book's Introduction formed part of my article "Containment, Subversion -- and Postmodernism", in Textual Practice (Spring 1993).

Let me also thank Oxford University Press's Andrew Lockett for his early

-vii-

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