The Grief of God: Images of the Suffering Jesus in Late Medieval England

By Ellen M. Ross | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1.
This is not to suggest that the image of the suffering Jesus did not appear until the twelfth century. Barbara Raw Anglo-Saxon Cruecifixion Iconography and the Art of Monastic Revival ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990) provides a superb analysis of Anglo-Saxon Crucifixion iconography and demonstrates the centrality of "love" in Anglo-Saxon depictions of the Crucifixion. She suggests that "the meditative prayer of the late AngloSaxon period was much closer to that of the time of Anselm and Aelred than the texts would suggest" (66). I am pointing out a matter of emphasis and prevalence here. On the shift in artistic depictions of the Crucifixion, see, for example, Hans Belting, Likeness and Presence: A History of the Image before the Era of Art, trans. Edmund Jephcott ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994), and Emile Mâle, Religious Art in France: The Late Middle Ages: A Study of Its Iconography and Its Sources, trans. Marthiel Mathews ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1986), 83, chap. 3.
2.
On the Passion of Jesus in liturgical drama, see Rosemary Woolf, The English Mystery Plays ( London: Roudedge and Kegan Paul, 1972), chap. 11. On the association between liturgical drama and church architecture, see M. D. Anderson, Drama and Imagery in English Medieval Churches ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1963), and on the association between liturgical drama and art, see Otto Pächt, The Rise of Pictorial Narrative in TwelthCentury England ( Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1962), chap. 3. On Passion imagery in late medieval poetry, see Rosemary Woolf, The English Religious Lyric in the Middle Ages ( Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1968), chap. 6, and Douglas Gray, Themes and Images in the Medieval English Religious Lyric ( London: Roudedge and Kegan Paul, 1972), chap. 7.
3.
G. R. Owst, Preaching in Medieval England: An Introduction to Sermon Manuscripts of the Period 1350-1450 ( New York: Russell and Russell, 1965), 349.

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