Rainbow Rights: The Role of Lawyers and Courts in the Lesbian and Gay Civil Rights Movement

By Patricia A. Cain | Go to book overview

4
Private Rights: 1950-1985

Individual liberty is a necessary prerequisite to the possibility of moral choice and full personhood. If a person is not free to make certain critical choices in life, such as whether to love, whether or when to reveal her thoughts to others, and what God she will or will not embrace, then she is not capable of becoming an autonomous moral agent. For Jean-Paul Sartre, the key to being an ethical person was the freedom to choose. According to Sartre, if one exercises choice in accordance with a previously embraced ethical code, one is not really acting authentically. Instead, one is merely playing a role, acting in bad faith, and ceding responsibility for the choice to a predetermined code of ethics or a particular rule. Thus, if one acts in accord with a code of ethics, one is not authentically moral in doing so unless one chooses the applicable ethical rule anew in the moment of the ethical decision. The ability to choose freely is a prerequisite to morality, which is a core aspect of personhood. This principle was even true for Kant, who did embrace and develop an ethical code derived from the categorical imperative. The freedom to embrace one moral code over another was essential to Kant's vision of the ethical. Individual liberty is a prerequisite to becoming a moral being.

At the same time, individual liberty is not a value that always trumps other values in establishing authentic personhood. We live in a society that is composed of competing autonomous individuals with varying conceptions of the good. For a Robinson Crusoe, the consequences of free choice have a different meaning than they do for those of us who live in a more populous society. Crusoe's choices affect only himself. But when those of us in the organized society of today make a choice, that choice may affect

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rainbow Rights: The Role of Lawyers and Courts in the Lesbian and Gay Civil Rights Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • New Perspectives on Law, Culture, and Society ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Earlier Civil Rights Movements 12
  • 2 - Lawyers, Legal Theories, and Litigation Strategy 45
  • 3 - Public Rights: 1950-1985 73
  • 4 - Private Rights: 1950-1985 133
  • 5 - When Private Becomes Public 155
  • 6 - Bowers v. Hardwick 169
  • 7 - Public Sphere Rights Post-Bowers v. Hardwick 183
  • 8 - Private Sphere Rights Post-Bowers v. Hardwick 232
  • 9 - Public Recognition of Private Relationships Post-Bowers v. Hardwick 254
  • 10 - Conclusion 277
  • Table of Cases 289
  • Bibliography 308
  • Index 313
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.