Understanding Rock: Essays in Musical Analysis

By John Covach; Graeme M. Boone | Go to book overview

7
Tonal and Expressive Ambiguity
in "Dark Star"

GRAEME M. BOONE

We're saying: "Let's have faith in this form that has no form. Let's have faith in this structure that has no structure."

-- Jerry Garcia, in David Gans, Conversations with the Dead

In the vinyl Valhalla of rock, the Grateful Dead have earned a special place. Born in 1965 amid the flourishing countercultural movement of San Francisco, the Dead pioneered in the development of musical performances as druglike "experiences," featuring long, unpredictable improvisations and an eclectic mix of influences. As the hippie movement faded, the Dead provided the impetus to a vast culture of followers, known as Deadheads, whose musical and social ideals stem directly from those of the hippies, with elements of pacifism, openmindedness, hedonism, and the use of psychedelic drugs. The Deadhead movement has flourished down to the present day, showing no signs of abatement up to the disbanding of the group in November 1995 after the death of lead guitarist Jerry Garcia. In that year the Dead still ranked fourth in the country in earnings from touring, thanks to the sellout crowds at their many performances; in 1991, they ranked first. 1

With such popular affirmation, who, then, would speak ill of the Dead? To many who do not like them, their music sounds directionless, complacent, and otherwise boring or sloppy; for others even more numerous, distaste for their psychedelic tribal image precludes any serious musical appreciation. The comments of the benchmark Rolling Stone Album Guide, tinged with skepticism, offer what seems to be a common mainstream assessment of the group.

As much a phenomenon as a band, the Grateful Dead have over the last quarter century gathered together the far-flung members of their massive cult for live shows that

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Rock: Essays in Musical Analysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Notes ix
  • Notes xi
  • Contents xv
  • Contributors xvii
  • 1: Progressive Rock, "Close to the Edge," and the Boundaries of Style 3
  • Notes 25
  • 2: After Sundown the Beach Boys' Experimental Music 33
  • Notes 54
  • Notes 59
  • Notes 89
  • Notes 111
  • 5: Swallowed by A Song Paul Simon's Crisis of Chromaticism 113
  • 6 155
  • Notes 166
  • Notes 171
  • Notes 206
  • Index 211
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 219

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.