Inequality at Work: Hispanics in the U.S. Labor Force

By Gregory DeFreitas | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
The report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Education, concluded that: "If an unfriendly foreign power had attempted to impose on America the mediocre educational performance that exists today, we might well have viewed it as an act of war. As it stands, we have allowed this to happen to ourselves. We have even squandered the gains in student achievement made in the wake of the Sputnik challenge. Moreover, we have dismantled essential support systems which helped make these gains possible." National Commission on Excellence in Education ( 1983; p. 5).
2.
Quote and test results from Neuffer ( 1987).
3.
U.S. Department of Education ( 1987).
4.
For a recent survey of research on educational production functions and earnings functions, see Rosen ( 1977).
5.
Becker himself assigned a far more explicit role to cost factors than most others of the human capital school, at least in one instance. His Woytinsky Lecture (added to the second edition of Human Capital in 1975) sketched a more complete supply-demand framework in which the optimal volume of investment in schooling was said to be that at which the marginal rate of return from the last increment was just equal to its marginal financing cost.
6.
Educational cost data are from U.S. Department of Education ( 1987) and family income data are from U.S. Bureau of the Census ( 1987b).
7.
For data on federal aid to higher education see U.S. Department of Education ( 1987).
8.
See, for example: Blau and Duncan ( 1967); Hill and Stafford ( 1977); Mare ( 1980); and Masters ( 1969).
9.
See the empirical findings in Waite and Moore ( 1978).
10.
See, for example, Linda Edwards ( 1976).
11.
1980 census figures, presented in Table 2.2.
12.
See Osborne ( 1976), Quintero ( 1972), and U. S. Department of Commerce ( 1979).
13.
1980 estimate, from U.S. Bureau of the Census ( 1987b). For research findings on bilingual education, see Duran ( 1983); Fishman and Keller ( 1982); and Von Maltitz ( 1975).
14.
See U.S. Bureau of the Census (1984b) for this and the following set of 1980 statistics on average characteristics of non-Hispanic whites and of Hispanic ethnic groups in this section.
15.
See, for example, Fligstein and Fernandez ( 1985).
16.
For details on census variables and sample design, see U.S. Bureau of the Census ( 1983b).
17.
For a discussion of the properties of logit, see Amemiya ( 1981).
18.
U.S. Department of Education ( 1979a, 1979b).

-208-

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Inequality at Work: Hispanics in the U.S. Labor Force
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Tables xi
  • Figures xv
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - The Emergence of the Hispanic American Labor Force 10
  • Appendix 48
  • Notes 50
  • 3 - Growth and Stagnation in Employment and Earnings 53
  • Notes 92
  • 4 - Hispanic Unemployment Across the Business Cycle 95
  • Notes 126
  • 5 - Unemployment Differentials Among Spanish-Origin Groups 130
  • Appendix 163
  • Notes 166
  • 6 - Hispanic Capitalism: Dimensions and Prospects 167
  • Notes 185
  • 7 - The Educational Crisis of Hispanic Youth 186
  • Notes 208
  • 8 - Does Immigration Harm Native Workers? 209
  • Notes 251
  • 9 - Epilogue 253
  • Bibliography 258
  • Index 277
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