Distinguished African American Political and Governmental Leaders

By James Haskins | Go to book overview
takeover, but only a few hundred people, most acquaintances of Barry's, came out to demonstrate. There was little that Barry could do.Many predicted that Barry would not run for an unprecedented fifth term in office, and he has announced that he will not. His own biography on the Washington, D.C., city Internet Web site states, however, that "The new millennium will see a new D.C. as Mayor Barry continues to facilitate downtown development and the full utilization of interactive technology within D.C. government." Many people have predicted the end of Barry's political career over the years, but he has always been the prototypical "come-back kid."
Sources
"Biography of Marion Barry, Jr." Mayor's Page. 〈http://www.ci.washington.dc.us/MAYOR/ mayorbio.htm〉. Accessed: 3/13/98.
"Marion Barry Wins D.C. Nomination." Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report, 17 September 1994, 2603.
"Mayor Marion S. Barry, Jr." Congressional Times Journal. 〈http://www.usbol.com/cfjournal/〉. Accessed: 3/10/98.
"Milestones: Indicted. Marion S. Barry . . ." Time Magazine, 21 May 1990. Time Almanac, Reference Editon. Fort Lauderdale, FL: Compact Publishing, 1994.
"Milestones: Sentenced. Marion Barry . . ." Time Magazine, 5 November 1990. Time Almanac, Reference Edition. Fort Lauderdale, FL: Compact Publishing, 1994.
Phillips Andrew. "A Blight at the Centre of Power." Maclean's, 13 October 1997, 32-33.
Riley Michael. "A Bright, Broken Promise." Time Magazine, 26 June 1990. Time Almanac, Reference Edition. Fort Lauderdale, FL: Compact Publishing, 1994.
-----. "'You Set Me Up!'" Time Magazine, 29 January 1990. Time Almanac, Reference Edition. Fort Lauderdale, FL: Compact Publishing, 1994.

Mary McLeod Bethune
Reproduced from the Collection of the Library of Congress, by Gordon Parks

Born: July 10, 1875, in Mayesville, South Carolina

Status: Died May 18, 1955

Education: Presbyterian Mission School, Mayesville, South Carolina, 1885-1887; graduate, 1893, Scotia Seminary for Negro Girls, Concord, North Carolina; graduate, 1895, Moody Bible Institute, Chicago, Illinois; the first African American to be awarded an honorary degree from a southern white college, Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida, 1946; awarded 11 honorary degrees from various institutions between 1910 and 1950

Position: Teacher, Haines Institute, Augusta, Georgia, 1895-1896; teacher; Kindell Institute, Sumter, South Carolina, 1897-1898; teacher, Palatka Mission School, Palatka, Florida, 1900- 1902; founder, Daytona Normal and Industrial School for Negro Girls (renamed the Daytona Institute; after 1929, it became the Bethune- Cookman College), Daytona Beach, Florida, 1904; president, Bethune-Cookman College,

-10-

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Distinguished African American Political and Governmental Leaders
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Foreword v
  • Preface ix
  • Sources x
  • Profiles 1
  • A 3
  • B 10
  • C 35
  • D 58
  • E 76
  • F 89
  • G 99
  • H 109
  • J 126
  • K 142
  • L 145
  • N 185
  • O 190
  • P 194
  • R 207
  • S 222
  • T 236
  • W 244
  • Y 263
  • Appendix 1 279
  • Appendix 2 281
  • Appendix 3 285
  • Appendix 4 287
  • Index 291
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