Court Masques: Jacobean and Caroline Entertainments, 1605-1640

By David Lindley | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ANY editor owes much to the assistance of fellow scholars. Colleagues in the School of English at Leeds University have patiently endured lunchtime inquisition on many matters of detail; John Barnard, Paul Hammond, Joyce Hill, and Alistair Stead have all made valuable suggestions; Michael Brennan and Stephanie Wright have helped me in identifying a number of masquers. Richard Rastall of the Music Department at Leeds has assisted me with technical queries and John Peacock of Southampton University answered puzzling questions about scenic detail. Gordon McMullen of Newcastle University kindly allowed me to see the chapter of his D.Phil. thesis relevant to The Coleorton Masque, and Cedric Brown of Reading University has generously permitted me to make use of an unpublished paper on Love's Welcome at Bolsover. I am grateful also to Ken Rowe, for the enthusiasm with which he answered queries about classical mythology, and especially for his translation of most of the Latin material in the texts. My chief debt, however, is to my colleague Martin Butler, who has saved me from a number of howlers, and, more substantially, in conversation and by his writing has materially shaped my thinking about the genre.

Michael Cordner, Martin Wiggins, and Simon Leake have each examined drafts of the edition with exemplary scrupulousness, have made profitable suggestions, and prevented many errors. Needless to say, none of these people are to be held responsible for any mistakes and omissions which remain.

-vi-

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