Court Masques: Jacobean and Caroline Entertainments, 1605-1640

By David Lindley | Go to book overview

THOMAS CAMPION


The Lord Hay's Masque

To the most puissant and
Gracious JAMES, King of Great Britain˚
The disunited Scythians, when they sought˚
To gather strength by parties, and combine

That perfect league of friends, which once being wrought 5
No turn of time or fortune could untwine,
This rite they held: a massy bowl was brought,
And every right arm shot his several blood
Into the mazer till 'twas fully fraught;
Then, having stirred it to an equal flood,˚ 10
They quaffed to th'union, which till death should last,
In spite of private foe, or foreign fear.
And this blood sacrament being known t'have passed,
Their names grew dreadful to all far and near.
O then, great Monarch, with how wise a care 15
Do you these bloods divided mix in one,
And with like consanguinities prepare
The high and everliving Union
'Tween Scots and English. Who can wonder then
If he that marries kingdoms, marries men˚? 20


An Epigram˚

Merlin, the great King Arthur being slain,
Foretold that he should come to life again,
And long time after wield great Britain's state

More powerful ten-fold, and more fortunate. 25
Prophet, 'tis true, and well we find the same,
Save only that thou didst mistake the name.

Ad Invictissimum, Serenissimumque
JACOBUM Magnae Britanniae Regem

Angliae, et unanimis Scotiae pater, anne maritus30

Sis dubito, an neuter (Rex) vel uterque simul.

-18-

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