Court Masques: Jacobean and Caroline Entertainments, 1605-1640

By David Lindley | Go to book overview

Love Restored
In a Masque at Court,

by Gentlemen the King's Servants.˚

MASQUERADO I would I could make 'em a show myself. In troth
ladies, I pity you all. You are here in expectation of a device
tonight, and I am afraid you can do little else but expect it.
Though I dare not show my face, I can speak truth under a
vizard.˚ Good faith, an't please your majesty, your masquers are 5 all at a stand; I cannot think your majesty will see any show
tonight, at least worth your patience. Some two hours since we
were in that forwardness, our dances learned, our masquing attire
on and attired.˚ A pretty fine speech was taken up o' the poet too,
which if he never be paid for now, it's no matter; his wit costs him 10 nothing.˚ Unless we should come in like a morris-dance,˚ and
whistle our ballad ourselves, I know not what we should do. We
ha' no other˚ musician to play our tunes but the wild music˚ here,
and the rogue play-boy that acts Cupid is got so hoarse, your
majesty cannot hear him half the breadth o' your chair. 15

[Enter Plutus˚ disguised as Cupid]

See, they ha' thrust him out at adventure. We humbly beseech
your majesty to bear with us. We had both hope and purpose it
should have been better; howsoever, we are lost in it.

PLUTUS What makes this light, feathered vanity here? Away, imper-20 tinent folly! Infect not this assembly.

MASQUERADO How, boy!

PLUTUS Thou common corruption of all manners and places that
admit thee!

MASQUERADO Ha' you recovered your voice to rail at me? 25

PLUTUS No, vizarded impudence. I am neither player nor masquer,
but the god himself whose deity is here profaned by thee. Thou
and thy like think yourselves authorized in this place to all licence
of surquidry. But you shall find custom hath not so grafted you
here but you may be rent up and thrown out as unprofitable evils. 30

-66-

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