Audience Ratings: Radio, Television, and Cable

By Hugh Malcolm Beville Jr. | Go to book overview

The hype of 1981 and 1982 has given way to a realistic appreciation of cable's place in the spectrum of electronic media--alongside broadcast radio and television. Many problems remain, but their solution is more likely now that the industry fully understands what measurements are needed and can be afforded. With earlier misconceptions cleared away, a more realistically targeted approach to cable advertising solutions is possible in the immediate future.


NOTES
1.
William Stiles, executive vice president, Spanish International Network (SIN), operator of several LPTV stations, telephone interview with the author, July 11, 1984.
2.
Author's estimate, based on conservative per-subscriber cost of $600.
3.
Dennis Leibowitz, of Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, telephone interview with the author, July 11, 1984.
4.
"Arbitron Updates U.S. Cable Penetration," press release, February 23, 1984.
5.
The New York Times, February 21, 1984, reported the intense frustration of several cable networks--Showtime/The Movie Channel, Disney, Playboy, Bravo, and the Nashville Network--which are not carried on Manhattan Cable serving "an area that many industry officials say holds the most desirable cable-television audience in the nation."
6.
Ruth J. Betzer, A. C. Nielsen Co., in a letter to the author dated May 17, 1984, enclosing data from Ed Aust, manager of custom surveys, A. C. Nielsen.
7.
In Appendix D the biases of recall are delineated in the digest of "Radio Audience Measurement, 1944": older-age programs, longer length programs, and higher-rated programs produce highest recall ratings relative to coincidental measures. The opposites are clearly underrated.
8.
Nielsen press release, September 10, 1980.
9.
Robert Maxwell, "Pay TV Demands New Research Techniques," remarks before the Radio/TV Research Council, New York, November 28, 1983.
10.
A "headend" is the antenna point at which a cable system picks up its programs from broadcast stations and satellites. Some systems (about 20%) have more than one headend because of terrain factors. This means that the cable system can have different programming emanating from each headend. Therefore, Nielsen uses the headend as the unit of record.
11.
Cabletelevision Advertising Bureau, tabulations of April 1986.
12.
Robert Sieber, vice president for research, Turner Broadcasting System-, telephone conversation with the author on April 10, 1984.

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Audience Ratings: Radio, Television, and Cable
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Radio Services-- Pre-Tv (1930-1946) 1
  • Notes 26
  • 2 - Radio Services--Post-Tv (1946-1987) 28
  • 3 - Television Services (1946-1987) 62
  • Notes 81
  • 4 - Rating Methodologies: a Comparative Examination 83
  • Notes 129
  • 5 - Qualitative Versus Quantitative Ratings 131
  • Notes 157
  • 6 - Cable Ratings (1979-1987) 160
  • Notes 183
  • 7 - Using Ratings Data 185
  • Notes 217
  • 8 - Ratings: Servant or Master? 219
  • Notes 240
  • 9 - Government Intervention 242
  • Notes 256
  • 10 - What We Have Learned: 1930-1987 258
  • Notes 270
  • 11 - A Look to the Future 271
  • Notes 307
  • Appendix A - Ratings Basics: Terms, Calculations, and Relationships 310
  • Sources 315
  • Appendix B - Offices and Services of Principal Syndicated Ratings Companies Operating on A National Basis 316
  • Appendix C - Audience Measurement Highlights U.S. Total Population 321
  • Questions for Review and Discussion 333
  • Answers 376
  • Bibliography 389
  • Index 395
  • About the Author 407
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 414

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.