Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

there is no irremediable loss. Panic and consequent hard times have borne heavily on us. What many of us thought we had is gone. The shadow of need is over the earth and many of us in our hearts have said this season is misnamed.

But in all the years of our state and our national life we never so much needed a universal Thanksgiving as now. During our great wars, when the hours were darkest, then courage rose to the occasion. There was something so grand in the sacrifices we made that we could not mourn them. The bitterest sorrow of private loss was robbed of half of its bitterness by knowledge of the public gain. And so, if there is no visible heroism in the atmosphere about us; if we have lost money, energy, confidence, and even hope, let us make this Thanksgiving a festival of friendliness and be grateful that the best of our manhood yet remains.

There is every reason for being thankful. There is solid ground under our feet. It is simply because our own heads reel that we think an earthquake has shaken us. Brotherliness, faith in manly honor, and the spirit of helpfulness are older than the stock exchange or the cotton market. We have marvelous harvests; the chemistry of soil has been our handmaiden and we have the riches of earth, sea, and sky. What we have lost in money we have gained in social consciousness. There has been no scourge among us. Our abounding crops insure us against hunger; their wholesomeness guarantees us against disease. To these we add every field of thought and knowledge and invoke life everywhere to destroy death. If we have lost money, let us be thankful that we have gained fraternity; that we have households, neighbors, congregations, and commonwealths.

Now, therefore, I, O. Max Gardner, governor of North Carolina, in that spirit do proclaim Thursday, November 26, as Thanksgiving Day, grateful that

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