Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

mencement. The definite ending of one period and the beginning of another. In a peculiar sense your yesterdays of youth and growth will be separated from your tomorrows of manhood and responsibility by this bright interval we call commencement. Yet, in another sense, there should be no break with the past. Yesterday, as a student, you loved truth and to it paid your first and fondest allegiance. It should not be different with you tomorrow. Yesterday, as a youth, you lived in an attitude of wonder and from it derived a reverence for the things of the spirit, in brief, religion. Without this, tomorrow would be scarcely more than, "a tale told by an idiot," signifying nothing. Yesterday, as a human being, you were quick to resent oppression of the weak by the strong, courageous to denounce wrong wherever you found it.

Tomorrow would hold little promise if you should falter in this sublime faith that a better ordering of things is not only desirable, but is possible.

I congratulate you and, further than this, as an alumnus of this institution, I welcome you into that great brotherhood of men whose lives have been enriched and ennobled by contact with the spirit of this place.


ETERNAL VIGILANCE THE PRICE OF FREEDOM

ADDRESS DELIVERED AT THE HISTORICAL CELEBRATION AND PAGEANT NEW BERN, N. C.

JUNE 12, 1929

Ladies and Gentlemen:

I esteem it a high privilege to come here today and have some part in this occasion. The stirring events which it so happily and beautifully commemorate are

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