Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

year. The idea, therefore, that " North Carolina must Live-at-Home" and must "make a living on the farm" must become a permanent possession of the minds of the people of the State. The principles of live-at- home must be put into effect year after year and every day of the year.

The purposes of Live-at-Home Week are manifold. In the first place, Live-at-Home Week seeks to encourage every farmer and every farm tenant to grow sufficient food and feedstuffs to be self supporting--thereby making unnecessary the annual importation of more than $150,000,000 worth of food and feedstuffg into the State. In the second place, we seek to awaken, in the hearts of those people who live in our cities an earnest desire to give preference to North Carolina farm products. And in the third place, we would urge North Carolina farmers to select on a much larger scale pure- bred, certified seed for planting and to breed pure-bred dairy cattle and livestock. In other words, the farmers of this State must learn to grow the right crops, to plant the best seeds, and to rid North Carolina of the scrub.

A great deal of reliable information is available to demonstrate that already the effects of the live-at- home movement have been far-reaching. In my bi- ennial message to the General Assembly I pointed out that the results for the first. year of the live-at-home movement have been most gratifying. May I call to your mind some of the things which I stressed in my message? Last year, as a result of our earnest campaign, we reduced our cotton acreage 234,000 acres and increased our corn acreage 271,000 acres. We increased our yield of corn above the 1929 crop 1,040,000 bushels. And by the way, we received a higher price per bushel than we received for the 1929 crop. We increased all of our home-consumption crops. Our corn crop increased 12 per cent; cow peas 19 per cent;

-270-

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