Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

THE PROPOSED CONSOLIDATION AND MERGER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA, NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE, AND NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE FOR WOMEN INTO THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA

RADIO ADDRESS DELIVERED FROM STATION WPTF Raleigh, N. C.

MARCH 2, 1931

Ladies and Gentlemen:

This afternoon the people of North Carolina had the privilege of hearing the Honorable Alfred E. Smith present his experience when, as four times governor of New York, he fought for and put into effect the reorganization of the general administrative functions of the government of that great state. His tremendous achievement in moulding and shaping the reorganized policies of the Empire State of New York will ever remain as one of the outstanding contributions to the progress and development of state government in this Nation. Today North Carolina, facing a grave crisis in her history, must make her decision as to the course she will pursue in reorganizing her administrative machinery of government so as to enable the State to serve more fully and more intimately as a government the needs of her citizenship. It is my conviction that this General Assembly has ably and constructively gone about its task of facing these issues and of providing the executive arm of government with a longer reach and a more effective control in its management of the peoples' business.

Tonight I bring you a special message dealing with one of the fundamental aspects of our whole problem of a larger and more comprehensive service to the present and future welfare of the state of North Caro

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