Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

Carolina ever to initiate and sponsor. This undertaking, starting here with a small meeting of law enforcing officers--the real protectors of North Carolina citizenship--has a significance out of all keeping with its size and its advertising.

I congratulate you, who have the hardest of all jobs, for your vision and zeal in improving the service you render society. Through your meeting in this magic spot, in which so many new visions of broadened service are caught, you are planning through a critical analysis of your jobs--their scope and their performance--to rededicate yourselves and your profession to the welfare of the State's entire citizenship.

I congratulate Professor Coates, too, for the beginning of fruition of ten years of study, planning and determination to make an idea see the light of actuality.

The problems which society's law enforcing officers have to meet are among society's most difficult problems. Your problem is to enable the individual citizens to go about their work with a fuller degree of the freedom and safety that has never been complete since Cain and Abel disagreed some time after the first man and the first woman had been driven out of the Garden of Eden.

I do not wish to discuss any technical subject with you or to attempt to offer any specific solution for the big problem of law enforcement. I wish, first, to bring you greetings from the State; and, second, to lay before you some aspects of law enforcement which frequently and recurringly come to the office of the governor for decision.

Orderly society, if its instability should ultimately reach the rocks of disintegration, may easily reach its final tragedy through the breakdown of law enforcement. Our complex dynamic civilization with its opportunities for good, or ill, is, it seems to me, traveling faster than we are traveling in our effort to harness

-332-

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