Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

and this State, knowing full well that on this campus the sons of North Carolina will be inspired by the harmony of these chimes and will here catch the vision and follow the gleam.

These two eminent sons of North Carolina--the donors of this tower of bells--spring from an ancestry whose roots have from the beginning run deep down into the life of this State. The Moreheads and the Pattersons have been identified with the finest and noblest aspirations of the people of North Carolina. Their families have been essentially interwoven with the life of this State in every period of its history and in all its vicissitudes. They have produced men and women who have been eminently useful to their day and generation. And the donors themselves, John Motley Morehead and Rufus Lenoir Patterson, have borne aloft the high tradition, of their families, and have reflected credit on North Carolina wherever they have gone. One happy thought about each of them is this: Although neither has lived in this State for thirty-five years, to each of them during this thirty-five years North Carolina has been home and the University of North Carolina has been to them the heart of North Carolina.

This University has been the beneficiary of the devotion of its friends ever since it has been a university. Indeed this institution has gleaned full as much from the unswerving love and loyalty of its friends and sons as it has from the bounty of the State. Yet, I am extremely doubtful if anyone at any time has given to it a more perfect gift than this tower of chimes; and I am happy that two practical men, two men of affairs, associate this spot and this institution with the beautiful and the spiritual.

To me it seems that this occasion furnishes the opportunity that summons friends and alumni to the task of seeing that this University shall not be compelled in

-365-

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