Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

THE DUKE ENDOWMENT IN NORTH CAROLINA

ADDRESS* DELIVERED AT THE CELEBRATION OF THE EIGHTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE DUKE ENDOWMENT CHARLOTTE, N. C.

DECEMBER 11, 1932

North Carolina pauses gratefully today to contemplate the philanthropies of James B. Duke. Rockefeller and Carnegie alone exceeded him in public benefactions. Our people could be neither just nor fairminded were they to forget or fail to appreciate what this man has done for the good of our Commonwealth.

Duke was an empire builder. His name was well known in all the markets of the world. Although he held no public office, he sent his ambassadors of commerce to the ends of the earth. And yet, at the zenith of his power he remembered the place of his birth. I can hear him say in the evening of his life: "Let me look at the rock from whence I was hewn." North Carolina, which had contributed him to the world and furnished him the stage upon which many of his dreams were realized, received the major legacies from his hands for its social, intellectual, and humanitarian enrichment.

I would not presume to tell you in detail what the Duke Endowment has done for our people. Many of you are better equipped to tell the story. It is my purpose, however, to discuss the manner in which this man gave his millions and to analyze the spirit and meaning of what he has done in North Carolina.

Education is one of the major purposes of the endowment. Hence at Durham, the university bearing

____________________
*
This address was printed in a pamphlet with other addresses delivered at the celebration.

-480-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 788

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.