Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

facts will be made. The selection of Judge Harding meets the approval of Solicitor Pless and the local authorities.


HUGH CHATHAM'S CHARACTER

OCTOBER 10, 1929

No finer Christian gentleman ever lived than Hugh Chatham.* Able, patriotic, charitable, a loving husband and father, and a true and loyal friend--he was a living embodiment of all those finer qualities of character and soul I have been taught to reverence most.

It would be impossible to estimate Hugh Chatham's influence for good upon his community and State. It was in any view incalculable, yet such was the modesty and immolation of self with which he wrought that his efforts had a way of assuming the appearance of public movements in which others seemed to lead. He was able without being arrogant, successful without being selfish, and sane without loss of the broad human sympathy which made common men love and trust him.

Such citizens are the glory of any commonwealth.


NORTH CAROLINA WILL SPARE NO EFFORT TO VINDICATE THE LAW

OCTOBER 28, 1929

The State must preserve the appearance as well as the spirit of fairness and even-handed justice. The

____________________
*
Hugh Chatham, promotor and leader in the woolen industry in North Carolina, was president of the North Carolina Railroad, chairman of the State and member of the National Democratic Executive Committees, state senator, member of the National Council of Defense, and was active in the social, civic, and religious affairs of Winston-Salem.
After a conference with the attorney general, Judge Townsend, and Solicitor

-496-

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