Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

to recommend the enactment of a number of its provisions into our statutory laws, convinced that its advanced and sweeping recommendations contain many helpful changes immediately suitable to our present situation.

I shall not recommend the short ballot to be applied to the appointment of constitutional officers, as advised by the Brookings Institution, but shall recommend it for the appointment of all state officers created by statute. Neither do I feel that the time is ripe to go as far as the report recommends with respect to institutional management. For myself--and I feel that the same rule would apply to the reason of the General Assembly--the test to be applied to each recommendation in this report is: Will it work efficiently? Will it promote the general welfare? Is it adjusted to our needs? And finally, in its ultimate operation, is it economical?


FATHER'S LETTER PRESENTED AS CHRISTMAS GIFT

JANUARY 5, 1931

The most appreciated gift I received Christmas was a framed letter written by my father from Raleigh, while a member of the North Carolina Legislature, to my mother, in 1858--twenty-four years before I was born. I was the youngest of twelve children. The gift came from my sister, Mrs. Clyde R. Hoey. My father was a strong Whig and was bitter against secession and the Democratic party. When war was declared, however, he immediately organized a military company, in which five of his brothers were members, and became an intense Democrat and Secessionist.

In this treasured letter he tells my mother many interesting things about Raleigh and its institutions,

____________________
33

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