Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview
in which they were regularly employed but also rendered valuable services throughout the entire county and often in adjoining counties.The live-at-home program has for its main purpose the encouraging of all of us engaged in farming to grow and supply ourselves with all the food and feedstuffs and livestock products necessary for family and farm consumption the year round. It would also encourage us to grow enough surplus to supply the small towns and the cities which are our logical markets; and it would encourage the city folk of this State to give a preference to the North Carolina farmer in their purchase of the supplies which he grows.The school children should be interested in and should support the live-at-home program because:
1. They can become acquainted with the agricultural conditions and needs of the State.
2. They can help secure the good will of the parents and neighbors for the movement.
3. The live-at-home program means better living for the entire State, especially for the children.
4. They can help call the attention of the farmers to the program now, which would enable them to include it in their farm plans for this year.

If the live-at-home idea is to be of any real worth in increasing the income from farming and in improving the living conditions of our farmers, it must be a continuing part of our whole agricultural scheme from year to year.

The financial distress of agriculture is being manifested in the dissatisfaction of the farmer with his tax burden; but the real effect is more far-reaching than this. To relieve the farmers of their tax burden altogether would fail to relieve them of their distress. I say frankly that one of the most serious elements in the intricate maze of interlocking difficulties with which this State is now grappling and which we lump together

-515-

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