Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

leadership can better plan our entire educational effort in terms of trends extending over generations, and can direct these trends into channels which will prevent waste and insure to rising generations the best educational opportunities the State can provide.

One of the outcomes from a consolidated institution, instead of three separate and competing institutions, is that we can now plan to provide in an orderly way for better educational opportunity and better service for every need of the young people of North Carolina. We want and will have a greater University, a greater State College, and a greater college for the education of young women.

Much of the unparallel development that has come to this State in the last generation is directly and indirectly traceable to its will to educate.

The central purpose of this reorganization is not to scrap any institution, not to eliminate any worthwhile educational service, but through unification of executive control and faculties and through a mobilization of all of the State's educational resources to provide finer opportunities for our sons and daughters to equip themselves for playing the game of life on a basis of equality with the men and women of every state and every section.

Of course, the board of trustees and the citizens of North Carolina realize that it is much better for us to have this job of consolidation carried out in a planned, scientific, and sympathetic manner than to be impelled under the stern law of necessity to throw the job into the lap of the appropriation committees of the general assemblies.

We may as well make up our minds in North Carolina that the superfluous is not necessary and that what is not essential will have to go, at least for the present. We know, if we are thoughtful, that the life and problems of the average man in North Carolina are an exact

-550-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 788

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.