Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview
of revenue against state expenditures based upon various levels of expenditure.I realize that the responsibility for decision rests solely upon me and with this knowledge before me, I have on my independent judgment arrived at the following decision as to policy:As director of the budget:
1. Not to undertake the questionable policy of withholding a percentage of school teachers' and administrators' salaries.
2. Not to make for the present any further cut in the salaries and wages of the officials and employees of state departments and, institutions.
3. For the first two quarters of the present fiscal year to make allotments to the various departments and institutions on the basis of the present existing salary and wage scales, and as to expenditures for purposes other than salaries on the basis of strict and rigid economy, as during the past fiscal year--which is seventy per cent of legislative appropriations.
4. If conditions make it necessary to call the General Assembly into extraordinary session in November to balance the budget for the remainder of this fiscal year.

The reasons which impel me to this course of action are as follows: during the period since July 1, 1929, I have, as director of the budget, cut legislative appropriations each successive year in the following amounts: $1,450,000, $2,100,000 and $2,700,000, or a total of $6,250,000. In addition to the above executive cuts, it is recalled that I recommended to the 1931 General Assembly a flat ten per cent reduction in the salaries of all state officials and employees not protected by the Constitution or statute, and that this recommendation was accepted and resulted in an additional saving of $2,500,000 annually in the cost of salaries and wages. In other words, during the three years of this administration there has been a total saving to the taxpayers

-553-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 788

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.