Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

gency relief legislation in Washington under which $5,700,000 will be available for Federal aid roads in North Carolina and an additional $1,000,000 will be available for the Smoky Mountains Parks and Forest highways--all to be spent before July 1, 1933.

The provisions in the bill relating to roads were drawn by Congressman Warren in February after a conference with Mr. Jeffress. Congressman Pou, chairman of the rules committee, secured a special rule to get the bill through Congress. Congressman Doughton of the ways and means committee helped greatly in shaping the bill for passage in that committee. Congressman Weaver secured the inclusion of the Smoky Mountains Park provision. In the Senate, Mr. Bailey, member of the committee on roads, was a leader in keeping the relief bill on to passage and fought for the inclusion of the Warren measure in the relief bill as passed.

I do not hesitate to say that the provision for roads and Parks would not have been included in the relief bills except for the aggressive leadership of these gentlemen and the active backing of the entire North Carolina delegation. This provision was fought by Secretary Hyde and Senator Bingham of Connecticut. It was supported by the entire North Carolina delegation in Congress and real credit should properly be given to our state leadership for its successful outcome. It ought to be the means for employing 5,000 able-bodied unemployed men in North Carolina this year.


HIGH POINT STRIKE ENDED

JULY 30, 1932

The conference in High Point today gives every assurance that the strike in this area, involving some 5,000 seamless hosiery workers, is ended, This settle-

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