The Government of Metropolitan Areas in the United States

By Paul Studenski; Frank H. Sommer et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
NEED FOR GOVERNMENTAL INTEGRATION

Whatever the reasons for the great number of political divisions, they do not provide an ideal political organization for metropolitan regions. They tend to divert the attention of the inhabitants from the fact that they are members of one large community and lead them to act as members of separate units. They result in great variation in municipal regulations in force in different sections of the metropolitan area, and in the standards of the services maintained, in sectional treatment of problems which are essentially metropolitan, in radical inequalities in the tax resources of the several political divisions, and in jurisdictional conflicts. The political subdivisions are jealous of each other and proceed in virtual independence. Each has its own legislative and executive organization, its traditions, policies, political issues. Frequently each political unit enjoys some special advantage which it desires to retain and which causes it to assume an attitude of suspicion towards other sections not possessed of such advantage; or it labors under some special disadvantage which causes it to envy other communities not under like handicap. It is difficult under these conditions to bring about concerted action throughout the metropolitan area. Consequently it is often well- nigh impossible to solve effectively municipal problems common to all.

In a report submitted to the Pennsylvania senate in 1854, a Select Committee of Senators from the City and County of Philadelphia described the condition which then obtained in the metropolitan district of Philadelphia. Their words may be applied to almost any metropolitan area today. The committee said1:

It is not to be supposed of human nature, that the people of these many separate local governments have not been actuated by a preference and seal for their separate interests, nor that coulsion and hostile feelings have not arisen obstructive to a concert of measures for the common welfare. With no paramount or pervasive power of legislation or control, no laws uniformly operative over the whole could be adopted or executed beyond the respective bounds of each. Rioters suppressed within one Jurisdiction take refuge and find Impunity within another. Measures of public improvement by the city or respective districts are arrested at each extreme of their narrow limits; and works erected competent to supply the wants of all with but slight additional expense, are cur-

____________________
1
From a memorial to the legislature of Pennsylvania; copy in the Library of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

-29-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Government of Metropolitan Areas in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.