The Age of Federalism

By Stanley Elkins; Eric McKitrick | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

C. Vann Woodward and Richard Hofstadter encouraged us many years ago to undertake this subject. They gave us their friendship many years before that, even before we had left graduate school.

Other friends and colleagues have given us a wide variety of assistance, such as advice in their special fields of competence or helping us to locate out-of-theway sources; of these persons there have been a great many. By now some may have forgotten what they did, but we have not. They include Edith Abbott, Robert Averitt, Jason Bitsky, Lawson Bowling, Howard Brown, David Cannadine, Elizabeth Capelle, John Catanzariti, Jack Chatfield, Barbara Chernow, Laura Downs, Joseph Ellis, Dorothy Fennell, Eric Foner, Peter Gay, Carl Hovde, Nelly Hoyt, Mary-Jo Kline, Mary McGovern, Diana Meisinger, Mark Nackman, Robert Paxton, Caroline Pierce, Jacob Price, Robert Rutland, David Schuyler, Craig Thurtell, Dorothy Twohig, Leo Weinstein, and Isser Woloch.

Benjamin DeMott, with fine Jamesian perspicuity, insisted that our tale should break off exactly where it now does, and that no tedious "Conclusions" were called for.

R. Jackson Wilson loyally read the entire manuscript, as he has done with much of our previous work, making many valuable suggestions and forcing our attention upon some questions we would otherwise have overlooked.

Mention must be made of two in particular whose combined impact on this enterprise required a whole year for us to absorb and come to terms with in the process of final revision. Kingsley Ervin, Headmaster of Grace Church School in New York, has occupied much of a distinguished career in helping others to know and to say more clearly what they mean. He did this for us, with his scrutiny of every line of our text and jottings on nearly every page -- the sum of which, we believe, has made considerable difference in the outcome. Herbert Sloan of Barnard College performed a similar office with the same thoroughness, not only with his own sense of style but through a command of the pertinent literature that is in every way fabulous. He tactfully filled in more than one patch of ignorance on our part and saved us from some real blunders. Our gratitude to both these friends is scarcely expressible.

The authors' families have been -- as the stereotyped formula goes -- "supportive" and "forbearing"; they have also given some very measurable assistance. Natalie Lamken and Dorothy Elkins read proof; Enid McKitrick took authori-

-vii-

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